September 16, 2011

Photos of TechCrunch Disrupt 2011

Ashton Kutcher

JD LasicaIhad a blast at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco this week. Met startup CEOs, some new and old friends, marketers, grassroots journalists — and not a few tech pioneers.

Here’s my Flickr photo set of 80-plus photos — including actor/celebrity Ashton Kutcher (who’ll be replacing Charlie Sheen on CBS’s “Two and a Half Men,” but has an incisive instinct for investing in innovative tech startups), Mike Arrington, Sarah Austin of Pop17, Gina Bianchini, Kevin Rose and my longtime partner, Ayelet Noff, aka Blonde 2.0.

See coverage of TechCrunch Disrupt and my accompanying interview with Ayelet Noff about four startups that made waves here.

September 15, 2011

Why are you so afraid of engaging bloggers?

Tips for how your agency or firm should do outreach the right way

http://milkandcuddles.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Rosie_The_Blogger.jpgChris AbrahamUnlike a few years ago, today everyone at least pays lip service to reaching out to bloggers, the same way that PR people have always reached out to mainstream media. That’s what my company, Abraham-Harrison, does and lots of other companies try to do it, too. But I am still surprised that many companies don’t do blogger outreach, even today. My conclusion is that what is holding them back is fear. Simply put, blogger outreach is scary.

And it’s not a completely irrational fear. It is true that bloggers are unpredictable and we all know, thanks to posts by the Consumerist and the Bad Pitch Blog, that one false move and you’re public mincemeat. Publicly shamed, drawn, quartered and, finally, drummed out of the corps.

We all know this, except that it isn’t so. The biggest faux pas that most agencies commit when they test the waters with blogger outreach has less to do with the natural meanness of the bloggers  and more to do with the behavior of the agencies. In many cases, the bad experiences that many agencies blame on the rudeness of the blogger is square on the agency’s shoulders.

It is a case of the abuser blaming the victim, the blogger.

In truth, the blogger often has no context for a PR outreach, has never been part of the publicity machine, and often doesn’t know what’s expected, what proper and improper behavior is, and most often is just behaving naturally and not part of some insidious cabal aimed at defaming you or your brand or your personal reputation. Continue reading

September 8, 2011

SOCAP 2011 in pictures

JD LasicaHere’s an Animoto video consisting of photos I took on the opening day of Social Capital Markets 2011 at Fort Mason in San Francisco — a breathtakingly beautiful day in the Bay Area that brought together 1,500 attendees at this year’s SOCAP conference to discuss social entrepreneurship, collective action, crowd-funded investmentments and lots more. Great to see all the familiar faces and good-hearted people working to promote social good and make the world a better place.

Here’s a Flickr photo set of SOCAP.

Related

Tips on attracting funding for a social enterprise (SOCAP 2008)

How to pitch your social enterprise (SOCAP 2008)

September 6, 2011

Control which image Facebook uses to represent your site

Facebook Thumb ImageDeltina HayAre you happy with the choices Facebook offers as the image thumbnail to represent “likes” of – or links to – your website or blog?

If you are unsure what I am talking about, look at the image at the right. When you post a link on your Facebook news feed or share a site by “liking” it, you are given several thumbnail images to choose from to represent the link as depicted. In this example, there are 36 choices.

The problem is that Facebook will often grab images that are unrelated to the linked page. For example, images from sidebars or ads may appear instead of relevant images. To discover which image Facebook sees as most relevant for any page of your website, use the Facebook URL Linter Tool.

How to control which image is used as a thumbnail by Facebook

Luckily, you do have control over which image is used as the thumbnail when you and others share content from your site on Facebook. There are a few options available.

First, you can place a line of code in the header of your Website that will force Facebook to use the same image for all of the pages on your site. Continue reading